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child support

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Texas has established guidelines for how much child support should be. In Texas, except in rare cases, only the income of the person paying child support is considered. For most people earning under $150,000, the payor will be ordered to pay roughly the following percentages of their after-tax income

1 child 20%
2 children 25%
3 children 30%
4 children 35%
5 or more children 40%

          The person paying child support is also usually ordered to pay for the children to have medical and dental insurance, and that cost is deducted from their income before child support is calculated. If the person paying child support has children with someone else, the percent of income ordered will be lowered. The Texas Attorney General has a calculator taking into account these factors than can give you a closer idea of what guideline child support will look like here.

          After someone earns $9200 in after tax income per month (roughly $150,000 per year) the percentages are no longer automatically applied, and the court is instead instructed to look at the actual needs of the child. In most cases, the courts tend to follow closely to the guidelines, and they are reluctant to order child support based on more than $9200 per month. An experienced family law attorney can help you decide if your case is one where the court is likely to award child support based on more than $9200 per month, even if the court may order child support in a greater amount than the percentage guidelines.

          If you are paying child support above the guidelines above, visit with an attorney to discuss how you can get your child support reduced.

          If there are special circumstances, such as the other parent moving far away, or visitation not following the current order, the court may also consider going outside the guidelines. Again, this is a situation that you need to discuss with an experienced family law attorney.

child support

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Who’s responsible for providing clothing when the child visits the parent paying child support? Many parents paying child support think “isn’t that what child support is supposed to pay for? Why do I have to provide clothes when I already provide child support?” You may want to check your order again. When the child is staying at your house, chances are you are meant to provide them the clothing and supplies they need.

You may have seen descriptors for attorneys letting you know whether or not they are certified by the Texas Board, but what does this really mean? And how important is it that your attorney have this qualification?

COVID-19 has caused serious financial problems for people everywhere, and many people are wondering, “What does this mean for me in the context of child support?” If you are concerned about not being able to pay your child support or not receiving child support that you may be counting on, find out what options you […]

For the first $9200 per month in after tax income (roughly $150k per year), Texas judges stick to the guidelines in almost every circumstance. Above this income level, there are no guidelines. You will hear attorneys say that someone has “maxed out”. There is a tendency to ignore anything above the guideline and just calculate […]

When child support is calculated in Texas, it is assumed that the person paying the child support is also providing the health insurance. Usually, this is done through the payor’s employment. If the payor does not have health insurance through his/her employment, or the payee has better or cheaper insurance available, then frequently, the payee […]

Child support in Texas is based entirely on the payor’s income if he/she earns approximately $150,000 per year or less. You start with the after tax income of the payor and subtract the cost of the child’s health insurance (the payor will also be providing health insurance). Then, child support is 20% for one child, […]

The Corona virus has caused many Texans to lose their jobs or sources of income. Does this mean that the court will hold you in contempt if you can no longer afford to pay child support? What if you rely on child support and it stops coming?

I thought I would mention some tips for making an appearance in court. Some tips will be obvious, some may surprise you, but all of them are useful. The one that deserves to go first is indisputable. Make sure your phone is OFF! If your phone goes off, the bailiff WILL be coming up to […]

Texas has established guidelines for how much child support should be. In Texas, except in rare cases, only the income of the person paying child support is considered.

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