Paternity

Paternity is the legal determination of a child’s biological father. In Texas, establishing paternity is crucial for various reasons, including parental rights, child support, access to medical history, and inheritance rights.

Establishing Paternity in Texas

In the state of Texas, paternity is automatically assigned to the husband if the couple is married. For unmarried couples, the father does not have legal rights to the child until paternity is established.

The process for establishing paternity in Texas can occur in several ways.

Voluntary Acknowledgment

One of the simplest methods for establishing paternity in Texas is through an acknowledgment of paternity (AOP) form. This form is typically provided by hospitals or birthing centers and allows unmarried parents to acknowledge the child’s biological father voluntarily.

Both parents must sign the form, and once it’s filed with the Vital Statistics Unit of the Texas Department of State Health Services, legal paternity is established.

Administrative Order Based on Genetic Testing

If the parties cannot reach an agreement on paternity voluntarily, either parent can request genetic testing to determine paternity. Genetic testing involves collecting DNA samples from the child, the alleged father, and the mother (if available). If the test results indicate a high probability of paternity (usually above 99%), the Texas Attorney General’s Office or a court can issue an administrative order establishing paternity.

Court Order

In cases where paternity is disputed or contested, either parent can petition the court to adjudicate paternity. The court may order genetic testing if necessary and will consider evidence presented by both parties before making a determination. If the court finds clear and convincing evidence of paternity, it will issue a court order establishing paternity.

Father’s Parental Rights and Responsibilities

Once paternity is established, the legal father is entitled to certain rights and responsibilities, such as the following.

  • Child Support: The legal father is obligated to provide financial support for the child, which may include child support payments based on Texas child support guidelines.
  • Parenting Time and Visitation: The legal father has the right to seek parenting time or visitation with the child, and the court will determine an appropriate custody and visitation arrangement based on the child’s best interests.
  • Access to Medical Records: Both the child and the legal father have the right to access each other’s medical records, including genetic and medical history.
  • Inheritance Rights: The child may have inheritance rights from the legal father, including the right to inherit property and assets under Texas intestacy laws if the father dies without a will.

Paternity Disputes

In cases where paternity is disputed or contested, the resolution process can be complex and emotionally challenging. Paternity disputes may arise for various reasons, including doubts about biological parentage, disagreements between parents, or concerns about financial obligations.

Texas courts handle paternity disputes through legal proceedings where both parties have the opportunity to present evidence and arguments. The court may order genetic testing to determine paternity if necessary. Individuals involved in paternity disputes need to seek legal representation to protect their rights and interests throughout the process.

Conclusion

Paternity is the legal establishment of a father-child relationship. In Texas, paternity can be established voluntarily through acknowledgment, through administrative orders based on genetic testing, or through court orders.

Paternity disputes are handled through legal proceedings, where the court considers evidence and issues rulings. Individuals involved in paternity disputes need to seek legal representation to protect their rights and interests throughout the process.